Browning Gold Semi Auto

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Browning Gold Gun review Browning Gold gun review Browning Gold gun review

Brilliant gun

 

Dave's Browning semi auto, it comes out occasionally to astonish the elm Farm Boys with its build quality, reliability and sheer size. It says 'Made in Belgium' on the barrel, but it will have been assembled in Portugal. There's a lot to be said for auto loaders Everyone ought to have one in the gun cabinet. 

 

 

 

The picture is a Gold, next to a 391. The Beretta does not have the fore end attached in this photo. The Beretta, with an extended choke, is a big gun, but the Gold is even longer. With barrels at nearly 30ins long it is a bit of a monster with more weight up front than Dolly Parton. Dave has lengthened the stock slightly and filled the stock void with 4oz of steel weight so that now it balances properly. This one also has a magazine cut off switch on the left side of the receiver. It is utterly superfluous in a gun that is used for clays, and Dave is toying with the notion of removing it to clean up the lines of the gun. This is quite an old example and only cost £250, but it is almost mint. It is reliable (It is the 3in chambered version). It used to cycle any shell it was given, but it's had a new recoil spring recently, and since then it likes to be fed on a diet of 28g shells.

 

If you are in the market for a semi, it may be worth looking out for something on the older side, they can be really good buys. If the Gold has a fault, it is that the shim set does not allow you to to adjust the cast, so if you need more than a tiny bit of cast, go for a more modern gun with a better shim set, or make some shim adjustments of your own using aluminium foil or something  Apparently the non humpback model isn't shim adjustable at all. Also be aware that if you go for the longer barrelled ones you will have to do some work to get it to balance properly. This may be true of all barrel lengths, but more so of the longer barrels,

Why you should change the recoil spring in your auto loader,

The picture shows the length of an old spring and the length of a new OEM spring. The old spring is pretty worn out, it has compressed with use, and is not doing the job it was designed to do. The older spring will let the bolt slam back with more force. This will likely result in the empty shells being ejected further from the gun, but more importantly, the steel bolt may start to act as a hammer against the back of the alloy receiver. That isn't what is supposed to happen and may/will ultimately result in damage. 

What do you get for your money if you a buy a Gold?

 

What follows is a description of a 1996 made, 12g Gold, with a barrel length measured at 29 1/4 ins from the receiver to the muzzle, and with a 3in chamber.

 

Starting at the front. Invector Plus chokes, a white front bead sat on top of a very simple narrow rib. There is no mid bead. Barrel markings say Invector Plus Chrome, so I guess the tube must be chrome lined, externally the blueing is top class. Fore end is simple plain wood, fairly lightly built, but with metal strengthening pieces bonded into the timber towards the rear. Finish is a gloss varnish of some kind. The fore end is held on by a light weight alloy cap. The cap screws onto the end of the mag tube in the usual fashion. The threads on the cap and the mag tube, are not deeply cut, and do not inspire much confidence, that said the arrangement has never been in any way problematic. Action sleeve is plastic, and the action rod is fairly lightly made. I'm guessing the light alloy and plastic parts at the front are an attempt by the designers to improve balance of the gun, or it may be an attempt by the accountants to keep the cost down. - take your pick on that one. Receiver is alloy, plain black anodised, no decoration save for the word 'Gold' engraved into both sides. Bolt and lifter are polished or chromed steel. Bolt locks to barrel extension by the usual stub mating into a cut out in the extension.

 

The trigger plate is blacked metal, and there are two cross pins holding it in place. Bolt release is a small chromed button. Safety is housed in the trigger guard behind the trigger.

 

Stock wood is plain and a bit short, but now LOP is 14 and 5/8in after making a spacer out of HDPE. Butt plate is the slim plastic type common to many Brownings. Disassembly and reassembly are very easy, though getting the bolt out with the trigger group still in place can be a challenge. Cleaning is just the same as any other auto.

 

How does it shoot?

 

With 4oz of weight added to the stock void, it balances at a point about 1/8in back from the rear of the fore end, (with no shells in the mag or breech). Mounting the gun the balance point is just about halfway between Dave's hands, which, I guess, is where it ought to be. Without the weights in the stock, this gun was significantly nose heavy, and that really did need sorting. It is reliable, it works all day long using 28g shells, It is pretty weighty, but that is no bad thing for clays. Recoil is no great drama. These are now pretty cheap on the second hand market, so you might find a decent one at an advantageous price if you are patient.

goldy.jpg
391gold.jpg
spring.jpg